iPhone continues to complement the Blue Ocean strategy

Many people believe that the competitive edge that iPhone and Apple enjoys over its competitors is the high-class leadership of the world renowned Steve Jobs. This is truly a reason why iPhone stands out of the ordinary and enjoys magnanimous success and market share all over the world. But, can anyone think as to what difference can one man bring about in the operations of a company? Well, I will surely open up not a new, but a perspective that generally ends up being ignored.

What companies do to stand-out?

Upon all the discussions and accolades that iPhone and Apple enjoys with respect to the leadership of Steve Jobs, one must understand the basis and the core philosophy at which the company is rooted.

Each company begins its operations with a few statements out of which the Mission Statement is far more realistic and logical as it is achievable. The mission statement is a statement of purpose and philosophy behind the existence of the company.

Moreover, strategies are made in order to achieve the designed company objectives. Normally we see technological companies based upon the Red Ocean Strategy, which is to capture what competitors are doing and perform it better than them.

Apple Computers actually work on the Blue Ocean Strategy.

The Blue Ocean Strategy of Apple iPhone

The Blue Ocean Strategy actually refers to the fact when an organization actually considers the competition as well as the market as ‘irrelevant’. This is when the company takes up a unique technology as its interface and develops a market of its own.

This Blue Ocean strategy is a huge reason why iPhone enjoys more than fifty percent of the world’s market share and Nokia, Siemens, Sony Eriksson, LG and Motorola combined are unable to decrease iPhone’s market share.

The Blue Ocean strategy has worked wonders as no matter how great your application is, it first has to be checked by people at Apple then they would convert it into the compatible format of the iPhone and upload it to the Apple Store. No application can be run on the iPhone without following this procedure. And this way, all iPhone users globally stay connected to one single hub, the Apple Store.

The Blue Ocean Strategy has done wonders for iPhone and Apple as a whole. Courtesy the mindset at which Steve Jobs operates the company, Apple promises to go a long way and would continue to fly high, no matter what (And I really mean it!!!).

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Asian Mobile Makers Squeeze Apple’s Global Smartphone Share To Its Lowest For 3-Years In Record 230M Unit Q2

iphone4 - profile02

More proof, if proof were needed, that Apple needs a low cost iPhone to get its smartphone momentum mojo back: Cupertino’s share of the global smartphone market fell to its lowest for three years in Q2, according to Strategy Analytics, with just 31.2 million iPhones shipped in the quarter and Apple’s second place ranking declining to a 14% market share – this despite the overall smartphone market growing 47% annually to reach a record 230 million units shipped.

“The current iPhone portfolio is under-performing and Apple is at risk of being trapped in a pincer movement between rival 3-inch Android models at the low-end and 5-inch Android models at the high-end,” said Neil Mawston, Executive Director at Strategy Analytics, in a statement.

Mawston told TechCrunch it’s not just a low cost iPhone that Apple needs to return to growth, although he agrees that is a requirement for Apple to drive extra volume. Cupertino’s top priority should be a new type of flagship to compete with Samsung’s phablets, he said.

“Apple’s first priority should be a premium-tier phablet with a 5-inch screen because that is where the largest new revenue pool is located,” he said via email. “Apple is losing profit share to Samsung partly because of a lack of presence in the phablet segment. Apple’s second priority should be a lower-cost iPhone to win back some of the customers it is losing to cheaper Android models in Asia, Africa and Latin America.”

“A 5-inch iPhone would generate extra value for Apple, while a cheaper iPhone would deliver extra volume,” he added.

Overall, the analyst said smartphone market growth is being driven by demand for 4G handsets in developed markets such as the U.S. and 3G devices in emerging markets such as India. Asian mobile makers, who predominately use Google’s Android OS, are now clearly dominating the surging smartphone market, with Samsung still in kingpin position – shipping 76 million devices in Q2 to capture one-third of all smartphone volumes worldwide in the quarter – and LG, ZTE and Huawei in third, fourth and fifth place respectively.

The analyst described LG as a “star performer”, with its global shipments doubling year-over-year to hit 12.1 million units in Q2 to take a 5% share. “The popular Optimus and Nexus models have been the main drivers of LG’s success. If LG can expand its retail presence and marketing in major countries such as the US or China, LG could quietly start to challenge Apple for second position,” Analyst Linda Sui added in a statement.

Chinese mobile maker ZTE also took a 5% share in the quarter, shipping a record 11.5 million smartphones to take fourth place for the first time, while Huawei shipped 11.1 million handsets to also grab 5% and take fifth.

Comcast and Verizon Decide They Don’t Need to Compete With Apple, Google and Everyone Else, After All

never mind

Last year, when Verizon Wireless and Comcast were trying to get lawmakers to sign off on a giant wireless spectrum sale/noncompete pact, the two companies also said they were going to create a technology/R&D joint venture. It was supposed to come up with really cool tech products that consumers would love.

That JV is now dead. Verizon announced its demise today during the company’s earnings call, but said the partnership actually ended in late August.

The news here is that the most important part of the Comcast/Verizon deal hasn’t changed. Verizon still owns valuable spectrum it purchased from Comcast, and the two companies are still agreeing not to compete – or at least not to compete very vigorously.

It’s not surprising that Comcast and Verizon have concluded that their JV didn’t make sense. Most JVs don’t. And if there is an example of two companies at the scale of Comcast and Verizon successfully working together to create cool consumer tech, I’d love to hear about it.

For the record, though, the two companies didn’t seem to have those doubts back in March 2012. Back then, when the companies were still trying to get federal approval for the deal, they were pointing to the JV as a big win for consumers.

Here’s what Comcast executive vice president David Cohen told a Senate subcommittee back then:

“By enhancing the Cable Companies’ and Verizon Wireless’s own products and services, the Joint Venture will compete with similar solutions that AT&T, Dish Network, Google, Apple, Microsoft, and others already have introduced into the marketplace. This, in turn, will spur other companies to respond, perpetuating a cycle of competitive investment and innovation.”

And here’s what Verizon is saying, via a spokesperson, today:

“The joint venture was formed to bring innovation to the marketplace and enhance the customer experience through technology that integrated wireline and wireless products and services. Evolving technology and market changes since the joint venture was formed have led all parties to conclude that a joint venture, per se, is no longer needed to deliver innovative services to customers. Verizon Wireless and the cable companies will continue to explore ways to collaborate on technology in the future. Each company remains committed to bringing innovation to its customers and will continue to find ways to optimize the user experience for each company’s products.”

If you’re a skeptical person, you might think that Comcast and Verizon were overselling the benefits of the JV from the start. You might think that they never really thought they could successfully compete with the likes of Apple and Google, but were holding out the idea because consumer groups were unhappy with the other parts of their pact, which seemed likely to reduce competition between the two companies.

On the other hand, both Comcast and Verizon did assign people to work on this stuff together, and they did do some work. Comcast, for instance, points to the Xfinity TV Player app, which lets you download movies and TV shows to your iPad and iPhone and take them with you, as an example of the joint venture’s output. [Update: Strike that. A Comcast rep tells us we had bad information: The app was made in-house, not via the JV.]

So, if you were a different kind of skeptical person, you might think that Comcast and Verizon really did think they could successfully compete with the likes of Apple and Google. And the fact that it only took them 17 months to realize they were wrong – and pull the plug – is a good thing.

(Image courtesy of Shutterstock/Carlos Caetano)

iPhone 5c Was Always Planned as Mid-Tier, Not Low-End, Says Cook

iPhone5c-trio

Is the price of Apple’s new iPhone 5c too high for the market for which it was intended?

Not according to CEO Tim Cook, who said the device isn’t intended for the unsubsidized prepaid customers that many observers thought it might be. During a Monday earnings call, Cook said the 5c isn’t the long-rumored “budget iPhone,” nor was it conceived as that.

“If you look at what we’ve done with our iPhone line, we’re selling the iPhone 4s as our entry-level offer,” Cook said. “We’re selling the iPhone 5c as sort of a mid-tier offer and then we have the iPhone 5s. Our goal is to have overall growth for the total iPhone [line], but also growth within each of those categories. … I realize that some people were reading rumors that the entry phone would be the 5c, but that was never our intent. Our entry iPhone is the iPhone 4s.”

In other words, Apple’s plan all along was to use a legacy device as its entry-level iPhone, just as it has done for years. And, as I’ve written before, the 5c was a move to establish a new mainstream price band between the smartphone market’s high end and its low end: “Historically, Apple has done quite well for itself using mid-tier products with lots of aspirational appeal to draw budget-conscious consumers into a higher price range. It did it with the iPod nano, and again with the iPad mini.”

Air Freshener: What They’re Saying About Apple’s Latest iPad

performance_gallery

With Apple’s new iPad Air headed to market on Friday, the first reviews of the device began publishing last night, and they are positive to a one, with more than a few extolling the device as not just the best iPad ever, but the best tablet on the market. Here’s a quick rundown of reviews:

Walt Mossberg, AllThingsD:
This new iPad isn’t a radical rethinking of what a tablet can be, but it’s a major improvement on a successful product. It is the best tablet I’ve ever reviewed. … The battery performance of the iPad Air simply blew me away.

Damon Darlin, the New York Times:
The iPad Air is noticeably lighter than its predecessors. If you are the least bit interested in the new tablet computer from Apple, you probably already know that. The company’s engineers shaved just short of a third off the weight of the earlier version; the 9.7-inch Air weighs only a pound. What you may not know is this: Those 6.4 ounces make all the difference when, as you recline while reading or watching a movie, you conk out and the iPad falls forward to bonk you on the nose. The Air won’t hurt you the way the old iPad did.

Rich Jaroslovsky, Bloomberg:
I’ve been using the iPad Air, which goes on sale Nov. 1, for a week now, and it’s hands-down the best tablet on the market. Apple has recrafted the hardware and packed in new software and services that make it more useful for creating content, not just consuming it. … Not that long ago, the iPad so dominated the tablet market that it would have been unthinkable to buy something else. With the rise of quality tablets from Google, Amazon and others, it’s no longer the only choice. But it’s still the best choice.

Anand Lal Shimpi, AnandTech:
This is the iPad that Apple likely wanted to launch on day 1, it just took a bit over three years to get here. … The iPad Air is the most significant upgrade to the 9.7-inch iPad in its history. It’s lighter, more portable, more usable and faster than any previous iPad. It doesn’t fundamentally change what you can do with a tablet, but if you’re in the market for one the iPad Air really is the best iPad to date. Competition is definitely more stiff among the smaller tablets thanks to the Nexus 7, but in the nearly 10-inch tablet space it seems like Apple is going to continue to enjoy a great position there.

Charles Arthur, The Guardian:
It’s only when you get hold of an iPad Air that you realise how well Apple has crafted this device. It’s lighter and the internals are faster. Add in the free software, and it has raised the bar on what you can do out of the box with a tablet. The iPad now isn’t just something to do a few functions around and about. It’s a device to replace your computer for almost everything.

Ed Baig, USA Today:
… This latest full-size Apple tablet is the most tempting iPad yet, better than its already best of breed predecessors, superior still to each and every rival big screen slate that I’ve tested. Apple dominates the tablet apps ecosystem. Its tablet remains the easiest to use.

Tim Stevens, CNET:
Functionally, the iPad Air is nearly identical to last year’s model, offering only faster performance and better video chatting. But factor in design and aesthetics, and the iPad Air is on another planet. It’s the best full-size consumer tablet on the market.

John Gruber, Daring Fireball:
To me, the comparison that is most interesting is to that of my MacBook Air. In exactly three years, Apple has produced an iPad that outperforms a then-brand-new MacBook. Three years is a decent chunk of time in this industry, and the MacBook Air has made great strides since then, but this (a brand-new iPad Air versus a late 2010 MacBook Air) is a credible comparison. In many ways the iPad Air is not just the superior device, but clearly so – it has a retina display, the MacBook Air does not; it gets 10 hours of battery life, the MacBook Air was advertised at just 5 hours back then (and as an old and much-used device, my personal MacBook Air gets significantly less than 5 hours of battery life today).

Brad Molen, Engadget:
Surprise: The iPad Air is the best iPad we’ve reviewed. In addition, though, it’s also the most comfortable 10-inch tablet we’ve ever tested. Not every manufacturer can produce a thin and light device without also making it feel cheap or flimsy, but Apple nailed it. Factor in a sizable boost in performance and battery life, and the Air is even more compelling. The last two iPads served up relatively few improvements, but the Air provides people with more of a reason to upgrade or even buy a tablet for the first time.

Vincent Nguyen, SlashGear:
The iPad Air is the no-compromise tablet. Beautiful display, crisp design, premium build quality: It’s the gold-standard by which tablets are judged, and rightly so. If Apple’s full-sized slates had fallen into the shadow of their mini brethren over the past twelve months, the iPad Air brings the larger tablet right back into the spotlight.

Darrell Etherington, TechCrunch:
The iPad Air is a huge improvement over the iPad 4th-gen, or the iPad 2. … Its form factor is the best currently available for a 10-inch tablet, and it provides a great blend of portability and usability that leans towards the media device end of the spectrum.

Ben Bajarin, Techpinions:
With the iPad Air, Apple has created the world’s thinest and lightest full size tablet. And by adding their 64-bit A7 processor they have made it extremely powerful as well. After using the iPad Air for the past week I’m convinced that the iPad Air is the perfect personal computer for the masses.

David Pogue, A note from Pogue:
At $500, an iPad probably doesn’t need replacing every year or even every other year; if you have a 2012 or 2013 model, stick with what you’ve got. On the other hand, you’ll find the Air a fantastic leap into the future if you’re upgrading from an original iPad, or if you’ve never owned a tablet before.

In Q2 of 2012, Apple managed to grab 84 percent of Mobile PC shipments. Tablet markets will remain strong in the year 2013

NPD DisplaySearch has released a report which says that Apple accounted for 84% of the mobile PC shipments in the second quarter of 2012. This became possible due to the success of Apple’s iPad. LG is leading the mobile PC shipments in the year 2012.
According to OEM, the Apple’s success in the market of mobile PC shipments is due to the rise in production of iPad 2 and iPad 3.the new iPad or iPad 3 was launched in the first quarter of 2012 after which its productions had to be increased due to increase in demand.The iPad 2 productions also boost up due to increase in its demand following the reduction in its price. It seems that recently iPad 2 is very popular among consumers as it contributed a major portion to the sales of iPad in the year 2012. But this is not certain because the company does not reveal its sales of individual device models while reporting their quarterly sales.

According to NPD, in the year 2013 the competitors of Apple will look forward to build stronger relationships with ultra slim PCs and touch notebooks. Jeff Lin, an analyst at DisplaySearch said that Samsung will try to decrease the Apple’s display manufacturing shares. They will add other customers like Noble, Barnes and Amazon in order to diversify their efforts.

NPD has predicted after the end of 2012, the growth of notebook PCs will be about 2% and there will be a fall of 28% in the category of mini-notebook year over year. It is expected that the growth of tablet will rise to about 75%. NPD has also predicted that in the year 2013, there will be a rise by 16% in the notebook PC shipments. It seems that Apple will play a key role in this growth but it will be interesting to see that whether other OEMs will have any effect on shipment volume.

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Snugg iPad 2 & iPad 4 Leather Keyboard Case in Black – Flip Stand Cover and Premium Nubuck Fibre Interior with Bluetooth Keyboard – Apple iPad Keyboard Compatible with iPad 2, 3 & iPad 4 Reviews

Snugg iPad 2 & iPad 4 Leather Keyboard Case in Black – Flip Stand Cover and Premium Nubuck Fibre Interior with Bluetooth Keyboard – Apple iPad Keyboard Compatible with iPad 2, 3 & iPad 4

  • Fits the iPad 2, iPad 3 & iPad 4 perfectly
  • Built in wireless Bluetooth 3.0 silicone keyboard
  • Bluetooth interface with a built in rechargable lithium battery
  • Full Access to all iPad Ports / connections while its cased
  • Get Snugg Quality and not Cheap Imitations!

Due to its innovative design, the keyboard is the case! The iPad Keyboard case combines a wireless keyboard with a built-in PU Leather premium stand. This case folds in all the right places, stands up perfectly for FaceTime or watching movies and there is a cut out for the rear camera so that you can use the camera without removing the iPad from the case. The High quality soft nubuck fibre interior and Velcro flap secure the iPad tightly in place when in landscape position. There is an area abov