Google’s Local Business Is “Really Struggling,” in “Constant Chaos,” Yelp CEO Tells Charlie Rose (Video)

Yelp CEO Jeremy Stoppelman

Yelp CEO Jeremy Stoppelman

Based on their relationship today, it’s hard to believe that Google almost owned Yelp.

The acquisition never went through, and today the two companies seem firmly entrenched on the enemy side of the frenemy divide, with Yelp CEO Jeremy Stoppelman teeing off on Google whenever he has the chance, and Google continuing to launch search innovations that seem to be aimed directly at Yelp.

The latest shot fired came during Stoppelman’s recent appearance on Charlie Rose’s interview show.

At one point, Rose asked Stoppelman whether Google’s purchase of Zagat could pose a threat to Yelp. In short, Stoppelman’s answer was no. But the longer answer is much more interesting, and a sign that Stoppelman, at the very least, still thinks about Google quite often.

Here’s how he answered the question – you can also watch it in the video embedded below. His response begins around the 17:40 mark:

Every six months to a year there’s a reinvention of what Google has been doing in the local space. You know, there’s just been change after change. And I think what that says, or I think what that should communicate is that they’re really struggling in the space. And they’re having trouble finding something that really works and something that they can stick with.

Originally, it was Google Local, then they made it Google Maps and then they changed it to Google Places. And then they had Hotpot, then they bought Zagat, then they tried Frommer’s and then they sold Frommer’s and then they’ve revamped Zagat. And so it’s constant chaos over there. And if you’re winning, usually it’s calmer waters. And the thing about Yelp is we’ve been doing the same thing for about nine years, so we feel pretty comfortable with our position.

A Google spokesperson didn’t respond to an email seeking comment, sent Sunday evening.

(Image courtesy of Flickr/Brian Giesen)

Google+ Local for iOS will be pulled on August 7th after being integrated into Google Maps

korea google 520x245 Google+ Local for iOS will be pulled on August 7th after being integrated into Google Maps

Google+ Local for iOS, Google’s mobile search and discovery app, will cease to exist on August 7th, just over one year after it made its appearance on iPads and iPhones.

According to an email from the Mountview company (h/t Engadget), Google+ Local for iOS will no longer be available as a standalone app on mobile Apple devices. However, of the app’s entire functionality will be merged into the Explore feature in Google Maps.

Google+ Local for iOS, formerly known as Google Places, lets users voice search for nearby restaurants, check Zagat restaurant ratings, and read and post reviews of local establishments. The app was itself a rebranded version of Google Places.

According to the email, all user reviews and ratings will remain accessible via Google Maps and one’s Google+ profile.

Google+ Local for iOS isn’t the first location-oriented service that Google has phased out as it revamps its mapping and local search offerings. Two weeks ago the company stated that Latitude, its map-based location-sharing service, would retire on August 9th.

Earlier this year Google initiated a sizable overhaul of its Maps application, which included enhanced navigation, live traffic updates, the new Explore feature, and on the Apple front, improved visuals on the iPad. Last June the company acquired Waze, the Israeli social traffic and navigation app, for over $1 billion.

Image credit via Ji-Hwan Park/Getty Images

Google Maps 2.0 Rolls out to iOS, Offers iPad Support and More

Google Maps

Poor Apple Maps. While we see very minor improvement from Apple’s year-old Maps application, Google continues to improve its world-class offering pretty rapidly. Why, Wednesday, in fact, Google launched an update to the Google Maps for iOS app, adding support for the iPad, indoor maps, and a slew of other features that were released with the recent Android Google Maps update. Google Maps 2.0 now fully supports the larger screen sizes of the iPad and iPad mini, as well as offering indoor maps with walking directions for transit stations, airports, malls and other large buildings. Past that, you’ll also notice that the Google Maps iOS app now offers better navigation with live traffic updates and incident reports. Meanwhile, Apple Maps still hasn’t figured out transit directions.

Read the full story at TechCrunch.